Home > Gaming, Internet > A Review of the Video Games Geeks and Gamer Girls : Guest Post

A Review of the Video Games Geeks and Gamer Girls : Guest Post


Songwriters and producers Max Martin and Dr. Luke have cashed in hard off of one beat this year. The songwriters, responsible for chart smashes from Ace of Base’s “Beautiful Life” to the Backstreet Boys’ “I Want It That Way” to Kelly Clarkson’s “Since U Been Gone,” delivered two key hits this year, Ke$ha’s single “Tik Tok” and Katy Perry’s “California Gurls,” two songs written essentially in the same key, with the same structure, and strikingly similar melodies. Both hit number one on the Billboard Hot 100 and on a number of international charts, and as a consequence, they’re ripe for parodies like “Geek and Gamer Girls.”

The song takes Perry’s “California Gurls” and makes it, pretty unsubtly, about what this video’s creators assume geek culture is. This is done, like most things, through namedrops and floating images of products to obscure the singer’s breasts, as well as cameos by Seth Green, who replaces Snoop Dogg’s guest verse on the original, as well as by Stan Lee and Battlestar Galactica cast member Katee Sackoff.

However, its initial consumers seem to believe that they’re being lied to. Video host Break’s comments section rapidly degenerated into anger from both men and women who found the thing unrepresentative, sexist, or just every bit as irritating as “California Gurls” and its drunk cousins. One Break reader called the song “nine full bales of fake and lame.” Another simply said “Bad video. Terrible song,” but added “Totally saved by a rapping Seth Green and a Stan Lee cameo,” as if the guest appearances salvaged the material. Holly Green, a video games writer, wrote “We don’t need this sexist garbage. This is the kind of stuff that gets me (a video games writer) attacked viciously … for identifying my gender. It’s because many geek girls and gamer girls like to do this … using their so called hobby as another means to get men to line up and tell them how pretty they are. It’s kind of pathetic.”

Later comments are more forgiving, talking about how they enjoyed particular shout outs and how attractive the girls are. However, the discussion centers pretty clearly around the objectification of women, the fact that girls as portrayed here don’t actually look like people who play video games, and the perpetual, insufferable misogyny that defines large congregations of people who feel the need to post comments on sites like Break. If nothing else is interesting about “Geek and Gamer Girls,” it’s the fact that it and both the Katy Perry and Ke$ha songs that preceded it have elicited almost the exact same criticism and conversation.

Andrew Hall is a guest writer.

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Categories: Gaming, Internet Tags: ,
  1. September 17, 2010 at 7:18 pm

    As a girl, and as a geek, I don’t feel objectified at all. Frequently the people complaining about that are women who don’t have enough confidence in themselves to just laugh along. I question what kind of comments would be had if the video were filled of smelly women in moomoos?

  2. September 17, 2010 at 7:44 pm

    I mainly find myself troubled by the focus given to female gamers. They exist and aren’t as uncommon as it seems. I worry about the downsides of the deification of women gamers in regards to young women growing up with the stigmas and stereotypes associated with being a female gamer. Primarily the concern for a new generation of young women who feel they must draw attention to themselves purely through the exaggeration and flaunting of their gender.

  3. jettwinlock
    September 18, 2010 at 1:36 am

    Master Zombie :

    I mainly find myself troubled by the focus given to female gamers. They exist and aren’t as uncommon as it seems. I worry about the downsides of the deification of women gamers in regards to young women growing up with the stigmas and stereotypes associated with being a female gamer. Primarily the concern for a new generation of young women who feel they must draw attention to themselves purely through the exaggeration and flaunting of their gender.

    Also they have boobs.

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